Chapter 7 Representation and Manipulation of Knowledge in Memory

Modified: 2006-03-24

I. MENTAL REPRESENTATIONS OF KNOWLEDGE

A. Declarative knowledge--stateable facts (know that)

B. Procedural Knowledge--implementable processes (know how)

C. External Representations: Pictures versus Words

D. Mental Imagery

E. Dual-Code Theory: Analogical Images Versus Symbols--Paivio (1971)

F. Propositional Theory

  • Do not store in form of images
  • Instead have a "generic" code that is called "propositional"
  • Stores the meaning of the concept
  • Create a verbal or visual code by transforming the propositional code
    • You know who I'm talking about, the tall, redheaded guy, the one with the burn scar on his left arm. Do you know who I mean?
    • Why do convenience stores have 4, 5, 6 on their doors?

Carmichael, Hogan, & Walters (1932)

 

II. MENTAL MANIPULATIONS OF IMAGES

Functional-equivalence hypothesis

A. Mental Rotations--Shepard & Metzler (1971)

 

 

B. Image Scaling--Kosslyn (1975)

 C. Image Scanning--Kosslyn (1983)

 

III. SYNTHESIZING IMAGES AND PROPOSITIONS

D. Johnson-Lairds' Mental Models--(1983)

IV. SPATIAL COGNITION AND COGNITIVE MAPS

Cognitive Maps--Tolman and Honzik (1930)


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